Buying and Cooking Black Tip Shark

Fresh shark flesh will give slightly when pressed with a finger. Purchase shark meat with moist, translucent flesh. It should never be flaky.

Soak the meat. Cover the shark meat in buttermilk or lemon juice for at least 30 minutes. This will eliminate the smell of ammonia, which comes from the shark losing all of its blood after it is caught.

Cut out any dark meat before cooking shark. Leave any skin attached, as it helps retain moisture during cooking.  A slight ammonia smell can be eliminated by soaking the meat in buttermilk or lemon juice for 30 minutes.

The secret to successful shark cookery is to not overcook. Whichever of the following cooking methods you choose; your shark will be cooked when its flesh becomes opaque, yet is still moist on the inside.

Baking

Place shark in a greased baking dish, or wrap in oiled foil and place on a baking sheet. Brush with melted butter or oil and season with salt and pepper, or cover with a piquant sauce. Bake in a preheated 450°F (230°C) oven until done, about 10 minutes per inch (2.5cm) of thickness.

Grilling

Place fillets or steak chunks on skewers directly on a greased grill, 4 to 6 inches (about 10 to 15cm) above prepared coals or fire. Baste with butter, oil, or marinade. Cook until opaque and moist on the inside, 6 to 8 minutes.

Broiling

Place fillets skin-side-down on a well-greased baking pan. Pour in enough stock to cover the bottom of the pan. Brush top of fish with butter or oil. Broil under preheated broiler 4 to 5 inches (10 to 12cm) from heat. Do not turn, but baste several times. Cook until opaque and moist on the inside, 6 to 10 minutes.

Pan frying

Fry shark in a small amount of hot butter or oil, turning once halfway through cooking time. Cook until opaque and moist on the inside, 4 to 8 minutes.